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The story of Esther – Made Simple

Jewish Blog The story of Esther – Made Simple
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After a period of dryness after the holidays, we get a “mini holiday” called Purim. Rattles, dancing, wine and a lot of joy and happiness. One of the symbols of the holiday and the mitzvah of Rabbanan is the hearing of the Book of Esther. The story of the Megillah must be heard both in the evening and the next morning, and all women and children are also committed to it, unlike the other commandments that women and children are exempt from. What is beautiful about the story of the Megillah, apart from the victory of the Jews over the Persian kingship and Medi is that each year we hear the same story and still have the tension that prevails during the reading of the Megillah. Let’s briefly review the scroll.

The kingdom of Haman and Ahasuerus

The Megillah Esther story begins with the kingdom of Persia and Medi. The king who controls all this territory is Ahasuerus and his faithful servant, his right hand, Haman the wicked. King Achashverosh has a colossal kingdom, many workers and one woman. Her name is Vashti, they say she was the most beautiful woman in the world, she showers every hour of the day, and always wears makeup and perfume. (At least according to commentators). Ahasuerus invites Vashti to a big feast he is holding, and she refuses to come. The whole kingdom talks about this complicated story, the king’s wife refuses to attend a banquet that the king himself is holding and she does not come. Shall be treated like any person who refuses to reach the King and executed. The king searches for a new queen and inherits the place of Vashti.

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The king is looking for a new queen

In those days, Haman terrorizes Jews in the kingdom. He did not like them because they were always smart and smart, businessmen and known, as today by the way, as “non-priars.” The most hated person was Mordecai the Jew, who was head of the Jewish community in Persia and Mede. When the king is looking for a queen to replace Vashti, he invites all the most beautiful women in the kingdom. Esther’s sister is called Esther. Esther was a beautiful girl in unimaginable heights, and therefore she was also summoned to reach the king. She had no choice, and she had to come. Following the story, Esther is fortunate to replace Vashti and becomes a queen.

Haman wants to destroy the Jews

In those days, as I mentioned in the previous paragraph, Haman harassed the Jews all the time, especially Mordechai the Jew. Mordechai does not count it so much and always thinks one step ahead of Haman. He even got to save the king immediately from his two servants who tried to poison and kill the king. This recorded in the king’s memoir and during the story of the scroll the king wishes to dress Mordecai in the royal garb, to mount him on a horse that the king himself rode on, and that Mordecai’s “best friend” will travel with him throughout the kingdom. Yes yes, the evil Haman.

Haman holds a lottery and picks up a note. The note says the date of the year in which he will destroy all the Jews in the kingdom. The king, of course, does not know that his wife is from the Jewish people and signs Haman on the declaration, and as a matter of fact, rather than condemn this terrible act. Haman was raising a tall tree to hang Mordecai on it.

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Esther updates Mordekhai about this terrible thing. The entire nation mourns for three days in which she invites Haman and Ahasuerus twice to the banquet to tell the king Haman’s plan to kill and destroy all of her people.

Haman tries to conquer Esther’s heart

During the second feast, Esther tells the king that Haman wants to kill all her people. Haman did not know very well where to bury himself and pressure jumped on Esther to defend himself. The king sees this harshly, telling Lehman, “You also want to kill my wife’s people and take her away from me.” Haman ended up like Vashti, and he hung on the tree he had prepared for Mordecai.

All is well that ends well

The story of the scroll ends at the end of the good, the king kills all the male of Haman and gives two whole days to the Jews to kill and destroy all the nations around the kingdom and within his empire. Esther sacrificed her life by marrying gentiles like Achashverosh, but it was very worthwhile to save the entire people. (The Zohar relates that Esther never had a relationship with Achashverosh but would have swaddled a breast, and she would have taken the shape of Esther and would have gone to that evil – and Esther would have stayed in her holiness and purity)

Purim is not yet in the open, but it will soon arrive. Make sure to enjoy and be happy all year, not just Purim. During Purim, drink wine, be happy with the families and make sure you get home safely.

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